Building Bridges Through Sensory Integration {Review}

Building Bridges Through Sensory Integration {Review} - jenniferajanes.com

Disclosure: I received a free copy of Building Bridges Through Sensory Integration from Sensory World for review purposes. I received no other compensation. All opinions are my own. I was not required to write a positive review.

Building Bridges Through Sensory Integration

Building Bridges Through Sensory Integration, Third Edition by Ellen Yack, BSc, MEd, OT and Paula Aquilla, BSc, OT and Shirley Sutton, BSc, OT is a book I wish I’d had when my daughter was first diagnosed with high-functioning autism and Sensory Processing Disorder. It contains good information for parents, teachers, therapists, and anyone else who spends time with children who have autism or sensory integration challenges.

Building Bridges begins by explaining sensory integration, sensory systems, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and occupational therapy in language that is easy to understand. The authors also provide anecdotes and examples to illustrate the information and make it even easier to comprehend.

The second part of the book is filled with very practical information to help caregivers provide children with interactions and assistance that will help with sensory integration in every setting. The chapter titles for Part 2 are:

  • Identifying Problems with Sensory Integration
  • Strategies for Challenging Behaviors
  • Ideas for Self-care skills
  • Adapting Home, School, and Childcare Settings
  • Activity Suggestions
  • Equipment and Resources

The information in these chapters is organized well, is easy to scan (lots of bullet points and white space on each page), and is useful and easy to apply. The authors have also provided links to PDF downloads of forms and activity cards to print so you don’t have to mess up your book trying to get to the forms!

This book is a great reference for me now, even after my daughter has spent years in occupational therapy. But if I had had it years ago, what a difference it would have made in empowering me to provide her with a better sensory diet at home and in knowing exactly what to do to manage inappropriate behaviors and to help her learn coping skills earlier! I highly recommend this book to parents whose children are just receiving diagnoses and to the people who help to care for and provide services for them.

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